Figuring Out Slash Chords

Scott quickly explains how to figure out slash chords when you see them in a chord symbol.

18 Comments
  • Harry "Gipper" Morris
    Posted at 12:14h, 28 October Reply

    It’s not as easy as it sounds. I’m playing melody with the right hand, how do I play a slash chord such as F/G in your example, with my left hand? I’m practicing a Xmas song “O Little Town of Bethlehem”, page 159, Ultimate Christmas Songs, Hal Leonard, edition 5. There are only 16 measures. There are slash chords in 10 of the measures. There are 5 different slash chords within that. I can’t play the slash chords while I play the melody. Gipper

    • Scott Houston
      Posted at 15:41h, 26 November Reply

      The trick there is to play the single bass note (what is to the right of the slash) down one octave from where you are playing the chord, then “grab” it with your sustain pedal and come up to play the chord listed to the left of the slash.

      You’re right – that is a tougher than just solid left hand chords … Go S-L-O-W!

  • Patrick Murphy
    Posted at 12:43h, 28 October Reply

    I’ve always said if I was on a desert island, the one object I’d take for recreation would be my Yamaha Clavinova. I can’t even begin to explore all of its capabilities in real life, given my schedule.

    Well, the second thing I would want is your videos. You explain piano in a way that is easy to understand and is fun to learn and practice. I am a left-hand-chord, right-hand-melody person so your lessons are especially useful.

    Just a note of thanks!

  • Jeannette
    Posted at 14:50h, 28 October Reply

    THANK YOU 🙂

  • Jim Birch
    Posted at 15:36h, 28 October Reply

    Good afternoon Scott…………appreciate the mini-lessons. A lot of good information in less than a minute. I have a quick question on another topic. Approximately a year ago, you solicited testimonials from those of us that have learned a lot from your various DVD’s/Books, for a possible taping. How did that turn out? Was anyone selected?

    Thanks again for all the good teaching that you have coming our way.

    Jim

    • Scott Houston
      Posted at 15:39h, 26 November Reply

      Hi Jim,
      Yes, that did get done. It was out of my hands, but the producers of the show did solicit a few people to give more in-depth testimonials. I sure appreciate your efforts though, assuming you were one who tried to help me out! Much appreciated!

  • ARTHUR PEPIN
    Posted at 20:19h, 28 October Reply

    THESE TIPS ARE EXCELLENT FOR EVERYONE IN THE EARLY STAGES OF LEARNING TO
    PLAY THE PIANO. WHEN YOU START USING SCOTT’S IDEAS, TIPS, ETC, IT’S AMAZING WHAT IT CAN DO TOO THE PIECE OF MUSIC YOUR PLAYING. GREAT IDEAS LIKE SCOTT’S MAKES IT FUN TO PRACTICE, PRACTICE AND MORE PRACTICE. ART P.

  • James Ferrantelli
    Posted at 11:11h, 30 October Reply

    Thanks Scott

  • George E. Wells
    Posted at 01:13h, 31 October Reply

    Another great tip — Thanks Scott —
    I always think of slash chords as inversions — this tip helps a lot
    with the slash chord that’s not an inversion.
    g/78

    • Judith Beaudin
      Posted at 08:39h, 27 August Reply

      I really want to learn the piano I can do the right hand but the chords are hard for me to play when I’m playing

      • Hannah Derleth
        Posted at 10:01h, 31 August Reply

        Hi Judith!

        We can definitely help you learn chords— Scott teaches them in a way that makes it much easier to understand than any classical lessons I’ve taken! Feel free to sign up for our FREE intro course or webinar to learn more about Scott’s teaching style.

        — Hannah

  • cara nome
    Posted at 13:51h, 03 November Reply

    NO COMMENT. JUST ENJOYING THE TIDBITS OF KNOWLEDGE YOU GIVE TO US.

  • Debi Labay
    Posted at 14:11h, 03 November Reply

    Thanks so much, Scott, for all your email tips. They have helped me tremendously.
    Also, I wanted to ask you – I notice that you are playing a digital piano. I currently have a 6 ft grand, but we live in the country now and like to have our windows open frequently for the fresh air. I know that’s tough on the piano. Also, there’s only one piano tuner in our area and the tuning on my piano has not been as accurate since I left the big city piano tuners. So…I was wondering which digital piano you would recommend if I decide to replace my acoustic piano with a digital. Obviously, I want something that looks, feels and sounds as similar to an acoustic as possible.
    Thanks,
    Debi

    • Scott Houston
      Posted at 15:15h, 26 November Reply

      There are many GREAT digital pianos out there these days, and I am a big fan for more than a few reasons (such as never needing tuning, and ability to wear headphones, etc). Go for full size (88 key), with weighted action (so it feels like piano and not an organ) with the piano sound you think sounds the best.

      The actual brand I was playing in that vid was most likely a Roland. They make GREAT instruments I like a lot. They underwrote my show for 5-6 seasons so I was very fortunate to get to play their instruments for a while on camera. http://www.roland-us.com

      There are plenty of other great brands too like Yamaha, Casio (their high end stuff, not the little keyboards in WalMarts, etc.), Kurzweil, Kawai, etc.

      Go to your local piano retailer and check out what they have to offer…

  • Christine A Lewis Anderson
    Posted at 04:11h, 23 September Reply

    Thank you for sharing your videos!

  • Roger R.
    Posted at 19:07h, 08 October Reply

    In your example, rather than playing the G as a single note with your second hand, or using the sustain pedal trick, wouldn’t it also be correct to play the F/G as G-A-C-F? Isn’t that just an inverted F with G added at the base?

    • Scott Houston
      Posted at 09:34h, 09 October Reply

      Absolutely! Good understanding there …

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