Improvising On Piano

Scott teaches a great way to get started into the world of improvising at a piano.

16 Comments
  • Harry Morris
    Posted at 10:47h, 10 November Reply

    Scott Houston, thanks for this tip. Can you show me an example of a real song that demonstrates the methods used in this video?

    • Scott Houston
      Posted at 15:16h, 26 November Reply

      Duly noted… I’ll try to do that in a future vid

  • Joy Knight
    Posted at 07:11h, 11 November Reply

    Great tip

  • ARTHUR PEPIN
    Posted at 12:53h, 11 November Reply

    I HAVE PLAYED PIANO MANY YEARS-CLASSICAL, POP, JAZZ, ETC BUT SCOTT REALLY KNOWES HOW TO HAVE FUN PLAYING WITH MANY SIMPLE RULES. I REALIZE HIS FAKE BOOKS ARE MOSTLY IN THE KEY OF “C” BUT I HAVE MORE FUN PLAYING THE PIANO THEN I EVER HAD, BECAUSE IT LEAVES ONE TO IMPROVISE, GET GREAT IDEAS, FOR FUTURE PLAYING IN OTHER KEYS. KEEP IT SIMPLE, RELAX AND ENJOY SCOTT’S WONDERFUL SIMPLE RULES. DEAL WITH THE SHARPS AND FLATS LATER, ENJOY TODAY. ART P.

  • robert wilson
    Posted at 13:02h, 11 November Reply

    You Sir,, are a wealth of such useful information to piano players everywhere. Please don’t stop these wonderful helpful hints.
    Rob in Canada

  • Kevin O'Malley
    Posted at 13:47h, 11 November Reply

    Thanks for the great improvising tip. I never considered improvising because I’m not a creative person. After watching you I thought to myself, “hey, Scott’s right, I should give this a try.” Also, I’ll never forget your advice on learning to play a song. You once said that no matter how slow the tempo is, do what is comfortable for you until you can play the song at a faster tempo, even if the tempo your playing at is ridiculously slow. I’ll never forget that advice. Live long and prosper! Thanks Scott.

  • John T. Case
    Posted at 21:05h, 11 November Reply

    I have been playing piano for 3.5 years using your methods and materials. I am currently practicing blues licks and bass-lines in an effort to develope a blues improvising capability. I may be interested in your on-line courses but I do not want to pay money to start at the beginning again going over stuff I already know. I have purchased several 1 on 1 videos from you. I’m using 4 note chords as often as possible and am comfortable with that. Is there a way you can determine where in your courses I can start? Your “Play Piano In A Flash” video I saw on a local PBS fund raiser was what convinced me that I too can learn to play the piano. It was an epithany for me and I thank you for that.

    • Scott Houston
      Posted at 15:38h, 26 November Reply

      I would think you could probably start in Course 3 and be OK. To do that you’ll need to give us a call though because we’ll beed to do it for you because we don’t want people starting there unless we are fairly sure they will be successful.

      Call us at 317-726-1901 and we can get you enrolled.

      SH

  • Tom Sullivan
    Posted at 02:38h, 13 November Reply

    I’d like it if you would send your e mails to this address (my iPAD) instead of my laptop (which my wife has commandeered). Thanks

    • Scott Houston
      Posted at 15:36h, 26 November Reply

      Tom,

      To change your email address (we can’t do it for spam protection reasons) click on the link at the bottom of the email you receive that says “update subscription preferences”.

      That will take you to our email service provider (MailChimp) where you can get that accomplished.

      And tell your wife to keep her mitts off your iPad 🙂

  • jon bethards
    Posted at 11:43h, 13 November Reply

    I enjoyed your improvisation video.
    Do you have CDs available that can teach me more?

  • Roger
    Posted at 09:29h, 14 November Reply

    Just a bit of feedback. I really enjoy the little video tips I get in my email. Over the years I’ve purchased several of your books, and transitioned from playing chord/melody guitar to piano in short order as a result. I still intend to sign up for a course someday, when the time is right.
    One of my hesitations is that I’m drawn more to hymns and traditional music–with their very basic chord progressions –than to popular and jazz.
    Perhaps you might address techniques for traditional worship music sometime. I struggle getting my left hand to keep an interesting rhythm going.
    Anyway, thank you for your wonderful efforts to bring the enjoyment of playing piano to so many more people.

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